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School Wide Positive Behaviour Lessons (SWPBL)

Our school community has identified the following values to teach and promote our high standards of responsible behaviour:

 
  • My Job – Be a learner. Every day, every lesson, everyone is responsible for their learning.
  • Society – Be respectful. Every day, every lesson, everyone follows society’s rules, treating people & property with respect.
  • Safety – Be safe. Every day, every lesson, everyone is keeping self and others safe.
  • Behaviour Consequences Prep to year 3
  • Behaviour Consequences Year 3 to Year 6
 

Our school rules have been agreed upon and endorsed by all staff and our school P&C. They are aligned with the values, principles and expected standards outlined in Education Queensland’s Code of School Behaviour, and we will explicitly teach these to the students through weekly lessons. We will have a focus rule each week which will be explicitly taught and practised. The rule will be promoted through parades and newsletters to ensure that our school community are receiving a clear and consistent message regarding acceptable behaviour at Malanda State School.

 

Students will receive positive feedback consistently and frequently for complying with these rules. We will focus on the positive behaviours of students to reinforce these standards to all of our students.

 


 

Bullying Definition

 
Bullying is repeated (INTENTIONAL) verbal, physical, social or psychological behaviour that is harmful and involves the misuse of power by an individual or group towards one or more persons. It can have long-term effects on those involved. Bullying can happen:

            Face to face (e.g. Pushing, tripping, name-calling)

            At a distance (e.g. spreading rumours, excluding someone)

            Through information and communication technologies (for example, the use of SMS, email, social media or chat rooms)

Some conflicts between children are a normal part of growing up and are to be expected. These conflicts or fights between equals and single incidents are not considered bullying, even though they may be upsetting and need to be resolved.

Identifying bullying can sometimes be difficult. Bullying is often conducted out of sight of teachers and children may be reluctant to report bullying.

If you believe that your child is involved in bullying, please see your class teacher.